Posts tagged ‘Dunn’

November 7, 2011

Dunn: Keeping That Small Town Feeling

Thomas G. Dunn

Four term incumbent Mayor Thomas G. Dunn is facing his biggest challenge since becoming the first unaffiliated mayor in the state in 2003. Yet, after the passage of a bonding referendum and four budgets in a row approved without any tax increases, he is ready for another two year term. His large homegrown family is helping him out as they always have.. Dunn is the 5th of 11 children – five boys and six girls – all except one of whom still live in town.

“We rode our bikes to EZ Pickens and met up at Bill & Sam’s all the time. We walked all over town back then,” he recalls. The Dunn family is still very close and some of the extended family still meets for a family meal on Sundays. His wife Lisa and he grew up together, meeting in high school and raising a family of two daughters and one son on Pleasant St. His son is a member of Fire Company #3.

read more »

Advertisements
Tags: ,
November 7, 2011

Olmstead: I’ll Make Wolcott Better

Steve Olmstead

Two years ago, a picture ran in the Wolcott Community News featuring a dog, Steve Olmstead, and his mother. Above the photo were the words “My Mother Would Vote for Me”. Voters saw an honest, sincere and apolitical man intent on doing what’s right. “That ad is why people voted for me,” Olmstead explains. As folksy as it was, he won a seat to the Council with the second largest number of votes in town.

One day later, he was the newly seated Council’s Vice Chairman’s. The Council was a mix of factions, never seen before in Wolcott history. Four Democrats, one Republican and four Row C candidates all grappling to control the financial body. Olmstead didn’t align himself with any group of candidates in 2009 and was waiting for results on his home TV when a defeated councilman knocked on his door to congratulate him on his victory. The stocky moustached former pastor of Grace Living Church says he recognizes today’s financial difficulties and the need to guide Wolcott through it. “We’ve been here before three or four times since the 1970s and 1980s. Its nothing new,” he tells the Whisper. The local business owner and former pastor has had to balance payrolls, write checks and other tasks which he says will assist him to running the town like a busienss.

read more »

November 6, 2011

2011 Election Ballot

There are fifty two candidates running for seven offices this year. For some offices, you vote for two candidates, others three or six. (And more than that actually win, but that’ll confuse your job on Tuesday). You’ve seen the signs. Now here you can see where they are on the ballot.

Remember that in the last two elections, many offices have been decided by 7, 20, and 42 votes. As of this writing, not a single one has been counted. Our soldiers fought for this right – so do your research, and make sure you participate!

There are TWO sides to the ballot. Don’t forget to look at both!

2011 Ballot – Front Side

2011 Ballot – Back Side

October 26, 2011

Candidates Forum Thursday

Candidates will be addressing residents Thursday evening at 7 pm at Tyrell School giving reasons they are running for office. All residents are welcome to attend, and are encouraged to ask questions of the candidates.

The format will allow candidates to speak for just a few minutes. Mayoral candidates Tom Dunn and Steve Olmstead will be in attendance. Refreshments will be served.

September 19, 2009

Independents Hold Greeting

Want to meet the newest political forces in town?

Randy Petroniro and many other independents will be at Musco Fuel today with food and refreshments greeting Wolcott residents. Stop by between 1pm and 3 pm to ask why the candidates are running and to get to know them.

June 3, 2009

Wolcott Republicans Pass No Tax Increase

There will be no tax increase in Wolcott this year. In fact, both the Board of Education and the Town budgets emerged virtually unscathed after a meeting filled with political fireworks. While last year’s hearing drew over 100 parents with many of them speaking before the Council began deliberations, no parent or member of the public spoke this year. While more attended than usual, there were still a few empty seats.

The budget meeting began with a Democratic proposal to reduce over $73,000 from the Mayor’s budget. This drew instant fire from Chairman Mark Wagner who questioned why such a large proposal covering 9 departments and 20 different line items wasn’t present sooner. Wagner argued that last week’s workshop brought a perceived agreement on the budget. David Gentile countered that there was no agreement. Mayor Dunn spoke against the proposal, stating that it would dramatically affect town services. “I agree with your opening statement, but find it hard to believe you went line-by-line of both budgets,” noting how the Board of Education budget was untouched by the Democratic proposal. The BoE budget makes up approximately two-thirds of the town budget.

Republican Chris O’Brien called the proposal ‘overreaching.’ “Your proposal reduces four line items for fuel -we don’t know where fuel prices will end up – already the price has gone up 50 cents over the past month.” He went on to contest most of their line items. Mike Santagotta defended the proposal by noting it will provide a tax decrease. “Approving the budget as it is will open the town up to a (funding) deficit- do you want that?” he asked. The Democratic proposal would have decreased taxes by 0.01 mills by figuring a 98.33% current tax and $750,000 back tax collection rate.

O’Brien noted that in past years mayors have taken money from the town’s rainy day fund as part of their budget proposals. According to the Town Charter, the Mayor must recomend a sum of money to be used from the reserve fund. The Council cannot do this on their own. The Mayor did not propose using any of the reserve fund this year. “If necessary, we can take money from the reserve fund to make up a deficit if there is one at the end of the fiscal year. Its taxpayer money too, and (a deficit) is what it’s supposed to be used for,” suggested O’Brien. Unaffiliated Councilman Mike Bokon joined Republicans in defeating the Democrats’ proposal 5-4.

Republicans first moved to vote to approve the budgets without any changes. But this vote also failed 5-4 after O’Brien voted against his party’s proposal.

“I wanted a $4425 adjustment to the Local Emergency Planning Commission allocation. I don’t believe the LEPC Commissioner justified his budget and some of his expenditures are questionable, including paying himself to write a standard report in addition to his annual stipend.” said O’Brien after the meeting. Democrats included this adjustment in their proposal.

Republicans held a caucus where an $1800 reduction to LEPC was proposed to satisfy O’Brien. They proposed increasing the back property tax collection rate, and kept the present 98.5% tax collection rate. Democrats argued that this collection rate is unrealistic in a difficult economic year. The budget was then passed 5-4. Democrats voted against the final mill rate which passed. The mill rate is 22.69 and tax bills will be sent out within two weeks. This is the same mill rate as this past year. A mill is assesed for every $1,000 of assessed personal property.